Cranbrook Art Museum in the News

“Artist Nick Cave Embraced Detroit, And We Hugged Him Back” |Detroit Free Press

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

The Detroit Free Press recently featured the editorial "Artist Nick Cave Embraced Detroit, And We Hugged Him Back," detailing the incredible impact this project has had on Detroit and the surrounding region.


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Mark Stryker’s Top Ten in the Detroit Free Press

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

Mark Stryker of the Detroit Free Press recently compiled his top ten list of metro Detroit exhibitions of 2015, saying, " Contemporary art is rarely as much fun as Nick Cave's Soundsuits."


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“Nick Cave: Here Hear” Named Second-Best Exhibition in Country

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

"Nick Cave: Here Hear" was recently named the second-best exhibition in the country by Hyperallergic, the online arts magazine. The news was also covered by the Detroit Metro Times and the Knight Foundation.


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“Nick Cave: Here Hear” Review | Art Forum

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

The Nick Cave: Here Hear exhibition at Cranbrook Museum of Art is reviewed by Matthew Biro in the December 2015 issue of Art Forum. “[…]the Cranbrook Art Museum presented a powerful demonstration of Cave’s incisive take on the current sociopolitical climate, while simultaneously evidencing his efforts to assemble alternative communities.”


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Treasure: Cranbrook exhibit spotlights Pewabic’s legacy | The Detroit News

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsCranbrook Center for Collections and ResearchExhibitionsSimple Forms, Stunning Glazes

Santa came a little early last week when I had the opportunity to preview the encyclopedic exhibition of Pewabic Pottery opening Saturday at Cranbrook. One of the largest private collections in the nation, “Simple Forms, Stunning Glazes” features the 117-piece collection of Gerald W. McNeely, recently donated to Cranbrook by the New York-based collector. I toured the luminous exhibition with director of the Center for Collections and Research’s Gregory Wittkopp and collections fellow Stefanie Dlugosz-Acton, who curated the exhibition. Both shared their thoughts about the collection and exhibition with Trash or Treasure readers.


Tagged: Mary Chase Stratton, Pewabic

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Cranbrook exhibit gets noisy with Lou Reed album | Detroit Free Press

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsLou Reed

Back in 1975, rock musician Lou Reed nearly drove his now revered career into the ground with the release of his fifth solo album, "Metal Machine Music."As one of pop culture’s earliest examples of experimental noise (meaning no songs and no structure), the controversial "Metal Machine Music" was largely hailed as a joke upon its release by fans and critics alike. It took decades before it  was given proper credit  for helping spearhead the idea of contemporary sound art.


Tagged: Lou Reed

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Wearable Artwork Makes Noise Against Racism | Studio 360

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

This is not a story about Nick Cave the Australian rock star. This is a story about a different Nick Cave: a Missouri-born fabric artist, sculptor, and dancer. Cave has become famous in the art world for what he calls “soundsuits,” wearable sculptures composed of bottle caps, sweaters, toy drums, globes, metal buckets, tambourines, purses, and anything else Cave finds rummaging through flea markets.


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View All Nick Cave Here Hear Press Coverage

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

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Nick Cave Closes Detroit Stay in Rousing Performance | Detroit Free Press

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

by Jim Schaefer, Detroit Free PressChicago artist Nick Cave wrapped up a seven-month metro Detroit invasion today with a rousing performance featuring local dancers, musicians and a visually stunning helping of his signature Soundsuits.


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‘Hear’ today, gone Oct. 11 | Observer & Eccentric Media

Cranbrook Art Museum in the NewsNick Cave

“We seek him here. We seek him there. We seek him everywhere.” Though that was the sentiment in the 1900s for heroic Scarlet Pimpernel, the same could hold true today for famed artist Nick Cave.


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